Category: Windows Server 2012 R2



Some of the IT people overlook this SID attribute of a machine forgetting the importance of unique SID/GUID requirements.

1. Try creating a clone of VM in Hyper-V or VMware Workstation and have them in Workgroup and see if you can enable communication between two clones
2. Try join the same clone VMs into Lab based domain and see how it goes
3. With domain user accounts added in the VM’s Lusrmgr.msc, post AD join and logging into VM with one of AD account and then demoting VM from domain, and then try to do a sysprep with domain accounts still there in local user accounts, and see if you can run sysprep successfully

Please do this Labwork and comment your results…

Just a sneak peak at the SID error…

sid-err-crp


We’re gonna solve the DHCP server authorization issue in this post. Error code looks like below:

“The authorization of DHCP Server failed with Error Code: 20070. The DHCP service couldn’t contact Active Directory.”

dhcp-post-config-20070 error

This is possibly due to user permissions on AD. Ensure you input Domain Administrator (DA) Credentials in the DHCP Commit dialog box, instead of proceeding with logged in account. There are chances that though you logged into DC using some user credentials, it doesn’t necessarily mean you are DA/EA. It could just be an account Admin locally, but not on Domain/forest. Check the DA user in ADUC and ensure you input those credentials to solve this.

Other things you should try if the credentials are DA is, ensure AD services are up and running. Check launching ADUC, Try Restarting DHCP Server services, Try re-installing DHCP from server manager. If you still encounter any issues, please message here, so we can further look into it to get it resolved.

Cheers!
Chaladi


Howdy! Today’s blog post is all about Microsoft’s Windows Server Failover Clustering. I’ve noticed that there are a couple of limitations in Windows Server Failover Clustering (WSFC). I am gonna keep adding the identified limitations, so keep checking.

 

First of all Shared VHDX issue. Shared VHDX is a clustering storage feature introduced in 2012R2 for windows server cluster participating nodes. If you’re wondering what is Shared VHDX and how it works, Please see here

 

So, now say, in a 2 node Shared VHDX cluster, you attach 4 Disks to the cluster resource, that is SQL considered as an example here, and both the cluster nodes have these 4 disks in Shared VHDX mode. This will help present the storage as Shared storage, so both the nodes in the cluster can see them. Now if I wanted to move the SQL form Node A to Node B, then all the Shared VHDXs on SQL owning Node will go to Reserve state and will come online on Node B, since we have moved the SQL to node B; and eventually SQL associated Disks and components will move.

Cluster Resource Move failure

Now, if for some reason, one of shared disks are not presented to Node B via Hyper-V manager settings, then Failing over the SQL to Node B will fail to move to Node B. The only error you get is “Cluster disk not connected”. And generating the cluster logs via powershell using “get-clusterlog -uselocatime -timespan 5 -destination D:\logs” too results the below logs.

 

“ERR   [RCM] rcm::RcmApi::MoveGroup: ERROR_CLUSTER_DISK_NOT_CONNECTED(5963)’ because of ‘Move of group SQL Server (MSSQLSERVER) to node CLUSTERNODE2 is not approved’”

 

Now the limitation I’m talking about here is, the cluster is not helping out you identify which exact Shared VHDX is not visible to the Node B. So, if Disk 2 is not presented to Node B, then the cluster knows in the background that it is failing to bring the cluster Disk 2 on Node B, so it should log all that “Bringing Disk 1 online on Node X — Pass, Bringing Disk 2 Online on Node X…” like so, that will help you identify the missing Shared VHDX on the Nodes.

In the above command I’ve used timespan of 5 minutes to pull logs regarding cluster. This avoid me generating a big file and to read all the unwanted stuff, since I’ve just tried to move the SQL off of Node A within the last 5 minutes.

Now, you may feel that you can use Disk management to see the Disks differences, but it works if you have few disks and they all represent different data sizes. If you have 15 or like Storage disks presented via Hyper-V and then almost all are same size, like 500 GB in sizes, then it would be kinda time waste to go through all those disk numbers comparing the disks on each nodes side by side.

 

Now, when I say limitation in Shared VHDX perspective, it could also apply to SAN storage presented via EMC powerpath or like that to the Cluster Nodes. But in that SAN storage directly presented to Cluster node, we can use Powerpath console to identify the disks missing using the reference naming convention used to label disks pushed to the cluster nodes while zoning. But it is still I feel a limitation exists in Windows clustering that is much needed to address at earliest.

 

And here, with Shared VHDX there’s a big issue with the Redirected I/Os that will kill your critical applications because of poor disk performance. A heavy disk utilising cluster resource must not use Shared VHDx as its storage for this reason. I will write more about this Redirected IOs issue in a separate post.

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